Friday, 24 June 2022

Beware of BP fuel card scams circulating on Facebook

 

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Rising fuel costs are on scammers’ radars, inspiring them to create new ways of tempting you to part with your money. A scam Facebook ad impersonating BP claims to give you the chance of receiving 200 litres of fuel for just £1.78. It’s a sponsored post – which means the scammer is paying to get it in front of as many people as possible.

Find out how to identify, avoid and report this scam.

Fake fuel cards

WARNING opportunist thieves on the lookout at night

Please be aware that on Friday 24 June 2022 03:40hrs a male offender attempted a car entry by trying car door on a  resident's drive in Cold Blow Crescent, Bexley - as shown in the video footage.

The resident immediately alerted the incident to their coordinator on Neighbourhood Watch.

So far report of two vehicles looted but nothing of value taken. The coordinator had further report of two tents in woods at the back of Cold Blow Crescent, that may or may not be related.

This is a warning to residents to check your CCTV footage or If you think you may have seen or heard anything suspicious, or have any information related to this incident then please contact the police on 101, or 020 8721 2816, or via email at stmarys.stjames.snt@met.police.uk alternatively you can call them above or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 1111.

We have had reports across the Borough and in Cold Blow Crescent of vehicles that have been left unlocked on driveways which have been being looted at night time.
 
Perhaps before going to bed have a routine of locking doors front and back and check vehicles are also locked - (also suggest don't leave anything of value in view). Further tips to protect your vehicle here.

Bogus caller ID to be blocked in bid to thwart scammers

 

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Phone networks will have a duty to block obvious scam calls under Ofcom plans

Scam callers will be blocked from displaying obviously fake caller IDs to potential victims under tough new rules.

The new measure aims to tackle the problem of 'number-spoofing' scams, in which scammers display fake numbers or text message shortnames to mask their true identity.

Loopholes in the current technology and regulation mean scam victims can receive, for example, calls that appear to come from the genuine helpline of their bank, or texts which display a bank's name.

Almost 45 million people were targeted by scam calls and texts in the summer of 2021, according to Ofcom.

Introduction of Confirmation of Payee fraud prevention tool

 

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Good news. Hundreds of banks and building societies must soon introduce the name-checking tool Confirmation of Payee (CoP) to help prevent bank transfer scams.

But what is CoP? Well, it’s easy to assume that your bank will warn you if you make a mistake when sending an electronic payment. But this isn’t always the case. CoP is the only way your bank can tell you if the name you've entered matches the account details held by the receiving bank.

This is something we’ve repeatedly called for as a crucial layer of scam protection. In the first half of 2021, bank transfer scams overtook card fraud – and with UK victims losing on average £28,203 an hour, it’s absolutely essential the banks move fast on this.

Does your bank offer a Confirmation of Payee? From Which? Find out here.

Wednesday, 22 June 2022

Get your free Cyber Action Plan

Answer a few simple questions and get personalised recommendations on how to protect your digital life.

Visit The National Cyber Aware Centre 

Learn how to protect yourself or your small business online with the Cyber Aware Action Plan. Answer a few questions on topics like passwords and 2-Step Verification (2SV), and get a free personalised list of actions that will help you improve your cyber security.

OR Click here to start the above.

Safety reminder of House fire – Erith

Firefighters have issued a white goods safety reminder after a house fire on St Brides Close in Erith.

Half of the first floor of a mid-terraced house was damaged by fire. One man left the building before the Brigade arrived. There were no reports of any injuries.

The fire is believed to have been accidental and involved a fridge freezer.

A London Fire Brigade spokesperson said: “If your white goods start making a strange noise, don’t ignore it. If you think there’s a problem always unplug it and contact the manufacturer or a qualified repair technician.

"Most fires where white goods are the source of ignition are not down to anything you have done – so always make sure you register your appliances as you’ll be informed if any issues are identified with the product you’ve bought.

“This incident is also a reminder to test your smoke alarms. There were smoke alarms fitted inside the property, but they didn’t operate.

“Smoke alarms give the earliest possible warning when a fire starts. We encourage everyone to have smoke alarms fitted in every room where a fire could start, plus a heat alarm in the kitchen. It's important to test them regularly.”

The Brigade was called at 0026 and the fire was under control by 0118. Four fire engines and around 25 firefighters from Plumstead, Erith, Bexley and East Greenwich fire stations attended the scene.

iPhone users targeted with new Apple Pay text message scam

Scammers are targeting iPhone users with claims that their Apple Pay has been suspended. This latest text scam tells recipients that their Apple Pay – Apple's mobile payment service – has been suspended and that they need to follow a link to reactivate the account. Find out how to spot, avoid and report this scam.

Read more: https://www.which.co.uk/news/article/iphone-users-targeted-with-new-apple-pay-text-message-scam-aRiJ77u99MJQ?utm_source=which&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=text_share - Which?

Monday, 20 June 2022

Spot the difference of a scam text

It can be difficult to tell the difference between a scam text and one that’s legitimate.

Criminals use a technique called “spoofing” to make it look like you’re being contacted by a genuine organisation. Avoid clicking on any links, and instead log in to your accounts to update your information or make any payments. You should report scam texts to your network provider by forwarding them to 7726.



Friday, 17 June 2022

Wildfire risk – share to help protect people and places

Nextdoor (social media app) posted the following:-

"This is what a wildfire looks like. Wildfires put people in danger and can devastate natural habitats. With warm weather expected in parts of the country this week, the risk is increased. You can reduce the risk through a few simple actions: -Don’t light fires in the countryside -Only have BBQs where signs allow, or better still – pack a picnic -Take rubbish home with you If you see a fire unattended in the countryside, note its location, get to a safe space and dial 999. Take care this weekend by following the Countryside Code: https://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/en_GB/countrysidecode/?utm_campaign=coco_22&utm_medium=NE_organic&utm_source=Nextdoor. Share to spread the word. See Nextdoor post for Video credit: Hampshire and Isle of Wight Fire and Rescue Service tackling a wildfire in Yateley, Hampshire (April 2022)"

LFB advice regarding Disposable barbecues are a serious concern as if they are left unattended or not disposed of safely they could result in a huge fire, especially when grass is tinder dry. Disposable barbeques can remain hot and be a fire risk after use, so take care when disposing of them.

LFB are warning people to take care not to overload extension leads after a house fire in #Bexleyheath. There were multiple extension leads plugged in together. Some electrical appliances use more power than others, so be mindful not to overload your sockets orlo.uk/SSTa9

Secure your home whilst you're on holiday

Whether you've planned or are planning a holiday, romantic break or just a night away, often the excitement distracts you from essential tasks, leaving home security at the bottom of the list. 

Here's some advice and ideas to consider from the police before you go, to help give you peace of mind while you're away.


Before you go 

  • To make your home look lived in, use automatic timer-switches to turn your lights on when it becomes dark.
  • Property mark belongings with your house number and postcode, take photos of property, particularly jewellery. Register your items for free at www.immobilise.com. Using this service will assist the police in returning property to the rightful owner should it be stolen and recovered.
  • Remember to cancel any milk or newspaper deliveries.
  • Avoid discussing holiday plans where strangers may hear details of your absence from home.
  • Cut the lawn before you go and trim back any plants that cover windows and doors or places where people could hide.
  • Uncollected mail is a sign that you're away. Ask a neighbour or a friend to collect it for you or consider using the Royal Mail Keepsafe service.
  • Store valuable documents or items in a safe. Alternatively consider leaving them with a family member, friend, or a bank.
  • If you normally leave valuable pedal cycles or similar in your shed, consider putting them in the house.
  • Make sure valuable items such as laptops, games consoles etc. are not on view from the outside.
  • Lock tools, ladders etc. away so that they cannot be used to gain entry to your home.
  • ​Consider fitting PIR or low-level lighting and, where necessary, extra window and door locks.
  • Make sure you have up-to-date building and contents insurance and check for any specific requirements relating to security.
  • Make sure you’ve locked all your windows and doors, and if you have an alarm, use it!

While you're away: Consider getting a relative, friend or neighbour to park on your drive if you have one, open and close the curtains, collect the post from the mat and water the garden. 

  • Be mindful of what you write or photos you share on social media which could identify you as being away on holiday.
  • Ask a trusted neighbour to keep an eye on your property and leave a contact number so they can get in contact with you if anything happens.

And another fraudulent Father’s Day contest

It’s no surprise, scammers like to use seasonal events as a hook for their fake competitions. Promoted as a Father’s Day present, scammers are sending fake WhatsApp messages that advertise a hoax competition to win a beer cooler.

While coolers full of Heineken beers sound tempting in this hot weather, always act with caution with messages out of the blue. See what the message looks like here.

Hoax Heineken contest

B&Q Father’s Day WhatsApp scam

In time for Father’s Day, scammers are impersonating B&Q to offer you the opportunity to participate in a fraudulent contest.

The phoney WhatsApp message reads ‘B&Q Father’s Day Contest 2022’ and goes on to advertise 5,000 free gas barbecues to be won by entering a competition. See what the message looks like here.

Dodgy B&Q contest 

Carphone Warehouse scam call exposed

This scam is back, with fraudsters impersonating Carphone Warehouse to target would-be customers under the pretence of selling a new mobile phone. But this time, Which? have documented the whole elaborate scam journey.

While they recommend that you always hang up on a suspicious call, they've gone along with this scam to show you how it works, what to watch out for and how to report a call such as this.

Video: Cold call scam exposed

Thursday, 16 June 2022

Beware Screwfix Dewalt Giveaway Fathers Day WhatsApp Competition Scam!



The "Screwfix Free Drill" Father's Day giveaway scam competition, which claims participants will get a free DeWalt drill, is spreading like wildfire on social media platforms WhatsApp and Facebook. The Screwfix Giveaway scam tricks potential victims into visiting the spam and fake survey website, "tinyurl5 ru", which tricks them into buying unwanted products or services, and disclosing their personal information, which will be used fraudulently.

If you have received the Screwfix Competition scam, just delete it as it is scam.

Screwfix is aware of the "Screwfix Fathers Day" scam. They said they would never ask their customers to provide any personal details via WhatsApp in order to enter a competition. And, if you believe you have been a victim of a scam, please report to Action Fraud at https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

Needless to say do not click on links that turn out of the blue. Take time to research and check this blog for advice and further information on similar scams.

Friday, 10 June 2022

New fraud measures announced to help combat scams

Hundreds of banks and building societies must soon introduce the name checking tool ‘Confirmation of Payee’ (CoP) to help prevent bank transfer scams. With victims losing £28,203 an hour, Which? have repeatedly warned that CoP is a crucial layer of protection.

But what is CoP? Well, it’s easy to assume that your bank will warn you if you make a mistake when sending an electronic payment. But this isn’t always the case. Only with CoP can your bank tell you if the name you've entered matches the account details held by the receiving bank.

Find out more about this form of payment protection and whether your bank offers it.

Payment protection

Scammers impersonate BT to steal your bank details

Phoney BT direct debit email

BT is being impersonated by scammers in an email that asks you to change your direct debit details.

As fraudulent emails go, this is a convincing one. It includes BT’s branding, logo and even BT’s customer service phone number. But the link behind the button directs you to a fake website. If you receive a message out of the blue about payment details, please always check with your provider directly before you click.

See what the email looks like and what to do if you receive one.

Fake direct debit emails

Saturday, 4 June 2022

Report an online scam ad

To report a scam ad, head to www.asa.org.uk/scams


Examples of such ads include:

  • - fake celebrity news, such as reporting a celebrity has been assaulted or has died when that is not true, or links through to websites making these claims
  • - false celebrity endorsements, such as claiming a celebrity made their money through cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and is encouraging others to do the same
  • - false claims that a celebrity or TV programme endorses products such as CBD gummies, diet supplements, or other health products
  • - clearly false or outlandish claims for products, for example that a device can save 90% on energy bills, or offering miracle cures.
Source: www.asa.org.uk/scams

Beware of BP fuel card scams circulating on Facebook

  click image to view enlarged Rising fuel costs are on scammers’ radars, inspiring them to create new ways of tempting you to part with you...