Saturday, 30 January 2021

Bending the rules costs lives


Cases of coronavirus have started to decline in England but need to fall faster to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Researchers at Imperial College London analysed more than 160,000 swabs taken between 6 and 22 January and found that, while cases fell nationally, the rate was not dropping swiftly enough to reduce strain on the NHS. 

Latest south-east London headline

  • Vaccination of housebound patients is underway
  • 86% of care home resident vaccinations are complete, across more than 100 care homes
  • Vaccinations are now being administered at four community pharmacies - with more due to open next week
  • 25 Primary Care Network vaccination sites are now open

Source: SE London CCG

Priority order for vaccinations



Encouraging people to have their vaccination

SE London CCG is working with local clinicians, faith leaders, care workers and community champions to create a series of films encouraging local people to have their vaccination.  

You can watch the latest video by Dr Omar Taha from here -

More than 20 people have come forward to make videos in a range of community languages such as Bengali, Guajarati, Hindi, Nepali, Pidgin, Punjabi, Tamil and Urdu as well as English.

Seven more videos are currently being edited for release on social media.

We are sharing a list of answers to frequently asked questions on our website, to encourage as many people as possible to get the benefit of a vaccination.

Below are two examples which we hope you will helpful.




Your questions answered

Please go online for the full list.

Is there any evidence to suggest the vaccine makes you infertile?

There is no evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine has any impact on fertility.

Does the vaccine contain any egg or animal products?

The Pfizer vaccine and Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccines do not contain any animal products or egg. The British Islamic Medical Association have produced a helpful guide for the Muslim community which can be found at www.britishima.org/pfizer-biontech-covid19-vaccine.

Vaccination: useful links



Twice-weekly no symptoms rapid testing

If you or a member of your household has symptoms, or you work in a public facing role in any sector, you can book a no symptoms rapid test quickly and easily at the Civic Offices Bexleyheath.   

Anyone with a negative result should book another test after three days, to ensure the results are completely accurate.

If your test is positive you and everyone in your household must self-isolate immediately for the next 10 full days. The 10 days begin the day after your test date.




New testing site opens in Welling

Another bookable NHS coronavirus testing site for those who have symptoms of the virus has opened in the borough.

The new site is at The Vine Christian Community Church, Welling.

The more sites we have the greater the chance that residents who have symptoms of the virus can be 
tested locally. Book via 119 or www.gov.uk/coronavirus 



Bexley Together on Twitter.


Friday, 29 January 2021

Attack of the clone firms: over £78 million stolen in 'clone' firm investment scams


New warning from Action Fraud, the City of London Police and the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA).

  • Number of ‘clone firm’ investment scams reported increased by 29% as UK went into first lockdown
  • Victims scammed out of more than £45,000 each, on average
  • 77% of investors do not know or are unsure what a ‘clone investment firm’ is
  • FCA and Action Fraud advise investors to only use contact details on the FCA Register to help avoid ‘clone firm’ scams

What is a ‘clone firm’ investment scam?

‘Clone firms’ are set up by fraudsters using the name, address and ‘Firm Reference Number’ (FRN) of real companies authorised by the FCA.

The criminal gangs running these scams can engage with victims through a number of channels. Often they will take out adverts on social media platforms and search engines. Victims will then click on these adverts and be taken to exact replicas of websites belonging to genuine investment firms. The most sophisticated criminals will even clone the website domain name. Once victims have registered their interest, they’ll be contacted by the fraudsters, who often obtain the names of genuine employees of investment firms and create seemingly legitimate company email addresses, but with very subtle changes.

There have also been instances of investors inputting their contact details into genuine price comparison websites and then being phoned by criminals purporting to be from a well-known, legitimate investment firm. Another tactic used by these criminals to dupe investors is to send victims sales materials linking to websites of legitimate firms.

The returns being promised by these criminal gangs are often modest so as not to arouse suspicion, but slightly better than the market rate, therefore appealing to those looking for long term, ‘safe’ investments.

In the end, victims will end up transferring their savings directly to criminal gangs, under the false belief that they are sending them to a legitimate investment firm. Often, victims  will not realise that they’ve been scammed until months later, when they fail to receive quarterly returns or investment reports.

Superintendent Sanjay Andersen, from the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau, said:

“The coronavirus pandemic has caused many people to feel financial worry and uncertainty - something which criminals will feel no remorse about capitalising on. We have sadly seen an increase in the number of investment fraud reports in 2020, compared to the previous year, with a spike in reports in the summer, after the first national lockdown was lifted.

"This new trend of 'clone firms' is particularly worrying as it makes it harder for people to spot a scam. Investing any amount of money comes with an element of risk and its important people take time to do their research by visiting www.fca.org.uk/scamsmart and seek independent impartial advice from an expert.

“If you think you’ve already invested into a fraudulent scheme, report it to Action Fraud.”

Mark Steward, Executive Director of Enforcement and Market Oversight, FCA, said:

“Clone investment scams are sophisticated and extremely difficult to spot. Last year we received over 3767 reports of clone scams to our consumer helpline. Fraudsters use literature and websites that mirror those of legitimate firms, as well as encouraging investors to check the Firm Reference Number (FRN) on the FCA Register to sound as convincing as possible.

“If you’re considering an investment, visit the FCA Register to make sure the firm you’re dealing with is authorised. Use the contact details on our FCA Register, not the details the firm gives you, and check for subtle differences to avoid ‘clone firm’ scams. And if you’re still unsure, call our consumer helpline for further information. When it comes to clones, I cannot emphasise enough how important it is to double check every detail.”

How to protect yourself

Even though two in five (38%)investors said they would check the company’s Firm Reference Number (FRN), checking this alone isn’t enough. Criminals carrying out ‘clone firm’ investment scams will often copy FRN numbers and encourage victims to check the number on the FCA Register to prove their legitimacy.

Anyone considering an investment opportunity should double-check all the details of a firm, not just the FRN, on the FCA register. This includes the telephone number and it is important you only use the number on the FCA Register to make contact with the firm.

Remember,

1.Reject unsolicited investment offers whether made online, on social media or over the phone. Be wary even if you initiated contact.

2. Always check the FCA Register to make sure you’re dealing with an authorised firm and check the FCA Warning List of firms to avoid.

3. Only use the telephone number and email address on the FCA Register, not the contact details the firm gives you and look out for subtle differences.

4. Consider seeking impartial advice before investing.

Investors can test if they can spot an investment scam from a smart investment by taking the Scam or Smart quiz, visit www.fca.org.uk/scamsmart to find out more.

If you think you’ve fallen victim to an investment fraud, report it to Action Fraud as soon as possible online at www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Action Fraud News 27-01-2021.

Thursday, 28 January 2021

Beware HMRC Tax Refund rebate Scam doing its rounds

 





The above images show a local resident received the message on her mobile. 

The screenshots have masked the links for obvious reasons, but one was passed to Bexley Watch and showed the link navigates to a 'Deceptive site and blocked' (red image). 

The other is a mobile 07943499453 she was called from and again it is doing its rounds as another resident had a similar call. Both of them did not return the call nor clicked on the suspicious links. The mobile number that called was checked on the https://who-called.co.uk/ site and revealed its rating as 'Dangerous' as shown on the screenshot.

The residents have reported the scams to the authorities. 

Example of an actual audio of HMRC scam message that did the rounds about Dec/Jan time from 0345 300 3900 an automated call regarding a fraud and arrest. He did not fall for that bait but contacted HMRC who told him the number is the same but that it was 'cloned'.

Ways to spot a tax scam

It could be a scam if it:

  • is unexpected
  • offers a refund, tax rebate or grant
  • asks for personal information like bank details
  • is threatening
  • tells you to transfer money.

Self Assessment customers can complete their tax return online and help and support is available on GOV.UK.

To protect against identity fraud customers must verify their identity when accessing HMRC’s online services. They must have two sources of information including:

  • credit reference agency data
  • tax credits
  • P60/payslip
  • UK Passport

If you’re concerned about falling victim to a potential scam, remember:

Stop:

  • Take a moment to think before parting with your information or money.
  • Don’t give out private information or reply to text messages, and don’t download attachments or click on links in texts or emails you weren’t expecting.

Challenge:

  • It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests - only criminals will try to rush or panic you.
  • Search ‘scams’ on GOV.UK for information on how to recognise genuine HMRC contact and how to avoid and report scams.

Protect:

  • Forward suspicious emails claiming to be from HMRC to phishing@hmrc.gov.uk and texts to 60599.
  • Contact your bank immediately if you think you’ve fallen victim to a scam, and report it to Action Fraud.

Check recent contacts from HMRC to help you decide if a suspicious email, phone call, text or letter could be a scam. Visit Check a list of genuine HMRC contacts for further guidance.










Quad9 and DMARC free cybercrime protection


The Quad9 DNS service protects users from accessing known malicious websites, leveraging threat intelligence from several industry leaders and blocking an average of 60 million threats per day for users in 90 countries. It improves your system’s performance, plus it preserves and protects your privacy.

Quad9 and DMARC have been set up by the Global Cyber Alliance (GCA). The GCA is a non-profit organisation aimed at tackling cyber crime that has been set up by the New York County District Attorney, City of London Police and the Center for Internet Security. 

What is Quad9

Quad9 is a free security solution that uses DNS to protect your system against the most common cyber threats. It improves your system’s performance, plus, it preserves and protects your privacy. It’s like an immunization for your computer.  

Setting up Quad9 requires just a simple change. Most businesses and home users can update in minutes. 

Find out how to set up free services that stop you from visiting malicious websites and protect you from email fraud for home users and businesses.

You can quickly and easily set up the Quad9 service on your Mac or PC. Do it today!

How DNS Works

  • Every website lives at a numerical IP address. Your Domain Name Server, or DNS, translates these numerical IP addresses into readable domain names we all know and remember. If your DNS settings are not working correctly, or you're still using defaults, you may be at risk for cybercrime and performance issues. Quad9 is a free security solution that uses DNS to protect your system against the most common cyber threats. It improves your system's performance, plus, it preserves and protects your privacy. It's like an immunization for your computer. Learn more at quad9.net.

Introduction to Quad9 DNS Service

  • Executive Director, John Todd, gives an overview of the Quad9 DNS Service and explains the benefits of its security and privacy features. For more information, please visit quad9.net.


How do to set it up on Windows PC



How to set in up on a Mac PC



How to Set Up Quad9 Connect on Your Android Device



Visit ActionFraud for more information onQuad9 and DMARC free cybercrime protection, or at our blog with Useful Links.


Wednesday, 27 January 2021

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine and vaccination (NHS)

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine [NHS]

The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine is safe and effective. It gives you the best protection against coronavirus.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine

[Page last reviewed: 21 January 2021, Next review due: 4 February 2021]

How you will be contacted for your coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination [NHS]

The NHS will contact you when it's your turn to have the coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination.

The vaccine is being offered at larger vaccination centres, pharmacies and some local NHS services such as hospitals or GP surgeries.

When it's your turn, you'll be contacted by letter, text or email with information on how to book your appointment.

More people are being offered the vaccine every week.

How you will be contacted for your coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination

[Page last reviewed: 21 January 2021, Next review due: 4 February 2021]    

Scam alert: Amazon gift card COVID-19 email requests



A new twist on an old scam has emerged, in which fraudsters are using the pandemic as the perfect excuse to trick people into buying them Amazon gift cards.

We’ve already exposed the fake texts and calls about the COVID-19 vaccine, sent by criminals attempting to steal personal data and card detail, but now we’ve seen fraudsters hacking into email accounts and using coronavirus isolation as a hook to target victims.

We often hear from scam victims who received a seemingly innocent email from a friend, relative or work colleague only to discover that they were communicating with a fraudster all along. 

Once an email account is hacked, criminals will try every trick in the book to make money, including sending emails to their contacts list. 

A common tactic is to ask them to buy an Amazon gift card (more often than not, as a present for a “niece”) offering a spurious reason as to why they can’t purchase this themselves – and the pandemic has given scammers the perfect excuse.

How the gift card scam works

As the recipients are likely to trust the address of the sender, they assume the request is genuine and kindly agree to purchase the gift cards. 

Now the scammer can simply ask you to share the serial numbers so that they can cash them in. 

Though the Amazon gift card scam is the one most commonly reported to Which? be cautious of any message asking you to make a purchase or divulge personal data.

If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you are suspicious about an email you have received, forward it to report@phishing.gov.uk. Suspicious text messages should be forwarded to the number 7726 which is free of charge.

If you believe you are the victim of a fraud, please report this to Action Fraud as soon as possible by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.

Source: Scam alert: Amazon gift card COVID-19 email requests [18 January 2021]

More on Which? on SCAMS.

WIN! Design a Croods 2 inspired treehouse and win it for your local community

 

In partnership with ‘The Croods 2: A New Age’ and Co-op, we want children up to the age of 16 to design their very own Croods 2 inspired treehouse for their local community. What’s more, the winning entry will be brought to life and built within a nearby Wildlife Trust location to be enjoyed by the public for years to come!

What do you need to do to enter?

  • Head over to Co-op Insurance website to download the treehouse template and top tips for entering
  • Design a Croods 2 inspired treehouse for your local community – it can be as wacky as you want, let your imagination run wild!
  • You can draw, paint, use computer software or even cave drawings to create your design, but above all be sure to think about how this could be used by the community and bring a lot of fun.
  • Share the design on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #Croods2Treehouse and tag Co-op (@coopukinsurance on Facebook and Twitter) and Neighbourhood Watch Network (Facebook: @ourwatch; Twitter: @N_Watch and Instagram: @neighbourhood.watch.insta) to enter.
  • The competition closes on 22nd February and the winner will be contacted within 5 days via social media. The treehouse will be built by 26th March, just in time for the film’s release and Easter holidays!
  • See the attached flyer, or click here (pdf), for more details.

  • View the fun The Croods2 fun activity pack here to keep children entertained whilst they are home schooling. Please feel free to share this with families in your area.  If you cannot print at home and would like an activity pack and competition entry template posted directly to your door along with a treehouse template to enter the competition please email croods2@isg.media.

    Tuesday, 26 January 2021

    COVID-19 VACCINE FACT CHECK - Spotting a scam


    Spotting a scam

    The COVID-19 vaccine is free of charge on the NHS.

    The NHS will never ask for:

    • your bank account or card details
    • your pin or banking password
    • copies of personal documents to prove your identity such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips.
    If you think you have been a victim of fraud or identify theft, report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040.
     
    For details on how you will be contacted visit the NHS about the COVID-19 vaccination when it's your turn.
    Page last reviewed: 21 January 2021
    Next review due: 4 February 2021

    Coronavirus vaccine scam warning



    Action Fraud is warning the public to remain vigilant as criminals begin to take advantage of the roll out of the COVID-19 vaccine to commit fraud.

    As of 7 January 2021, Action Fraud, the national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime, had received 57 reports in relation to the COVID-19 vaccine.

    How to protect yourself:

    In the UK, coronavirus vaccines will only be available via the National Health Services of England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer, a GP surgery or pharmacy local to you, to receive your vaccine. Remember, the vaccine is free of charge. At no point will you be asked to pay.

    - The NHS will never ask you for your bank account or card details.

    - The NHS will never ask you for your PIN or banking password.

    - The NHS will never arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.

    - The NHS will never ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips.  

    If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you are suspicious about an email you have received, forward it to report@phishing.gov.uk. Suspicious text messages should be forwarded to the number 7726 which is free of charge.

    If you believe you are the victim of a fraud, please report this to Action Fraud as soon as possible by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.

    Further Useful Information:

    The only website the service will ask you to visit is https://contact-tracing.phe.gov.uk.

    WARNING: Criminals continue to take advantage of coronavirus vaccine roll-out as phishing email reports soar

     Action Fraud is raising awareness of another coronavirus vaccine scam, after it received a high volume of reports relating to a phishing email on Monday 25 January.

    The email, which attempts to trick people into handing over their bank details, was reported more than 1,000 times in 24 hours. It appears to come from the NHS and asks the recipient to click on a link to accept or decline an invitation to receive the coronavirus vaccine. If they click accept, they are asked to input personal information and their bank card details.

    The national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime has previously warned about coronavirus vaccine scams, with many people reporting receiving fake text messages purporting to be from the NHS.

    Head of Action Fraud, Pauline Smith, is warning the public to remain vigilant as fraudsters continue to act:

    “It’s despicable that fraudsters will take advantage of such an important tool in the fight against this evil and deadly disease. Not only are the people being targeted with this email at risk of losing money, or having their identity stolen, but they are also at risk of not receiving the real vaccine.

    “The public have been fantastic at reporting these scams to us and raising awareness in their local community as well. But unfortunately, as this latest phishing campaign shows, we still have to remain cautious and alert. Remember: anything purporting to be from the NHS asking you to pay for the vaccine, or provide your bank account or card details, is a scam.”

    How to protect yourself

    In the UK, coronavirus vaccines will only be available via the National Health Services of England, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. You can be contacted by the NHS, your employer, a GP surgery or pharmacy local to you, to receive your vaccine. Remember, the vaccine is free of charge. At no point will you be asked to pay.

    The NHS will never:

    • ask you for your bank account or card details.
    • ask you for your PIN or banking password.
    • arrive unannounced at your home to administer the vaccine.
    • ask you to prove your identity by sending copies of personal documents such as your passport, driving licence, bills or pay slips. 

    If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up. If you are suspicious about an email you have received, forward it to report@phishing.gov.uk. Suspicious text messages should be forwarded to the number 7726 which is free of charge.

    If you believe you are the victim of a fraud, please report this to Action Fraud as soon as possible by calling 0300 123 2040 or visiting www.actionfraud.police.uk.

    Action Fraud: /

     

    COVID-19 & Vaccines Facts vs Fiction - Online Forum Event



    COVID-19 Vaccine Forum with Dr Tolullah Oni, BAME virus expert

    About this Event

    Online forum to address and answer the concerns of the Black and Minority Ethnic communities on the COVID-19 Vaccine and whether it is safe to receive it. An opportunity to ask a leading BAME virus expert the questions you want answers to.

    Dr Tolullah Oni is an urban epidemiologist at the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge. She is an expert in viruses as they affect the black and minority ethnic communities.

    The forum will be held on Zoom and the link will be sent prior to the event to everyone who has registered.

    To register for Zoom Meeting (Jan 27, 2021 07:00 PM), visit Covid & Vaccines - Fact vs Fiction or contact info@mansag.org. The Bishop of Woolwich, Bishop Karowei, and his wife Dr Mosun Dorgu, will be panellists.

    Wednesday 27 January, 7.00pm to 9.00pm, entitled COVID-19 & Vaccines Facts vs Fiction, organised by the Medical Association of Nigerians Across Great Britain. It will be held on online. 

    Please share this important information widely. Register at eventbrite for FREE for  the COVID-19 Vaccine Forum with Dr Tolullah Oni (Thu, 28 January 2021, 19:30 – 21:30) held online.



    Friday, 22 January 2021

    WARNING: National Insurance scam leads to surge in calls to Action Fraud

    Action Fraud, the national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime, is warning the public about a National Insurance scam, after it received over 1,000 extra calls from members of the public this week.


     Pauline Smith, Head of Action Fraud, said:

    “We are asking the public to remain vigilant and be cautious of any automated calls they receive mentioning their National Insurance number becoming compromised.

    “It’s important to remember if you’re contacted out the blue by someone asking for your personal or financial details, this could be a scam.

    “Even confirming personal details, such as your email address, date of birth or mother’s maiden name, can be used by criminals to commit fraud. If you have any doubts about what is being asked of you, hang up the phone. No legitimate organisation will rush or pressure you.”

    How to protect yourself

    If you receive an unexpected phone call, text message or email that asks for your personal or financial details, remember to:

    STOP

    Taking a moment to stop and think before parting with your money or information could keep you safe.

    CHALLENGE

    Could it be fake? It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.

    PROTECT

    If you have provided personal details to someone over the phone and you now believe this to be a scam, contact your bank, building society and credit card company immediately and report it to Action Fraud at www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.

    You can also contact CIFAS to apply for protective registration. This means extra checks will be carried out when a financial service, such as a loan, is applied for using your address and personal details, to verify its you and not a fraudster.

    Source: Action Fraud  /

    HOUNDWATCH APPEAL & REMINDER ON DOG THEFT (updated version)

    In recent times the number of reports of dog thefts has increased across the UK, with 2,000 dogs stolen last year.

    Thieves are known to often leave white chalk marks outside homes, to show which properties have dog’s worth stealing.

    The strange white lines of chalk have been appearing on brickwork, gates, and wooden fences outside houses - leaving people fearing they are being targeted.

    Back in July 2020, urgent advice was issued as police noted a spike in dog thefts.

    Police urged dog owners to stay alert after a rise in thefts in the UK's rural communities and around London. Officers advise to keep dogs microchipped, avoid putting photos of missing dogs on social media, keep an eye on the length of their coat so they're easily identifiable, and to make sure gardens are secured.

    Police say most of the dogs which are stolen are used for breeding or for re-sale value, and owners should vary times they take their pet pooches for walks.

    All dogs should be microchipped, it helps us when trying to identify a dog’s rightful owner, should they get lost or stolen. If you find a dog, please take it to a local vet or dog Warden and do not put it on social media. They will help make sure they are look after until their rightful owner can be found.

    Dogs are known to have been taken from gardens, kennels even when on walks. We would advise to always be on your guard and even if you think you have a secure garden, do not allow your dog to be alone for a long time without checking on them.

    You can report a stolen dog to your local ward police teams, contact details as included in this report. 

    Why not join our HOUNDWATCH scheme(pdf) it has been running for a few years has over 500 members & reports on dog theft are sent to members so they can help look for the missing pooch. We also ask that while HOUNDWATCH members are walking their dogs in Bexley that they report back to us anything they see that is suspicious, this can be drug dealing/taking, persons hanging around possibly to commit a crime, vandalism and even dumped rubbish. Reporting this can be done later when you are home or in a place safe to send the email to us, it needs to include place/time/date and what was spotted including description of person(s) etc. We will pass this onto either Bexley Police or Bexley Council as relevant.

    Why not sign up now? please pass this to residents in your covered area that you know own a dog(s), they will need to email us with their details to enrol and they will receive a confirmation reply from us to say they are signed up. Email us to: bexleynw@outlook.com

    Wednesday, 20 January 2021

    DPD delivery email scam targets public

    CTSI has received evidence of a delivery email scam targeting the public. The email claims that the recipient missed a parcel delivery by DPD and that a new delivery will need to be scheduled.

    To report email scams, contact the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) by emailing report@phishing.gov.uk

    For consumer advice, please call the Citizens Advice Consumer Helpline on 0808 223 1133

    The public and businesses are encouraged to join Friends Against Scams and Businesses Against Scams, respectively. These initiatives aim to protect and prevent people and businesses from becoming scam victims by empowering them to take a stand against scams.


    Saturday, 16 January 2021

    Scammers - Bexley Trading Standards update

    Scammers taking advantage of Coronavirus pandemic

    Residents are warned to be on their guard against scammers who are trying to take advantage of the Coronavirus pandemic.

    Bexley Trading Standards have received information that scammers are using the situation to extort money or gain access to people’s homes.

    Scams include:

    • door-to-door fraudsters impersonating NHS staff and offering help with shopping in return for payment, or seeking donations to fund a vaccine
    • individuals offering to go shopping for the elderly as a means to get and keep their money
    • criminals calling at homes and selling people bogus tests to see if they're infected with the disease

    Fraudsters are also sending out Coronavirus-themed phishing emails in an attempt to trick people into opening malicious attachments or revealing sensitive personal and financial details.

    Do not let strangers into your home, particularly at this time of self-isolation and social distancing.

    Source and more details at Bexley Trading Standards.

    Ruff time for animal lovers as scale of pandemic pet fraud unleashed by Action Fraud

      Data from Action Fraud,  the national reporting centre for fraud and cyber crime , reveals that £2,638,323 was lost by prospective pet own...