Thursday 29 September 2022

Bright red Ford Fiesta ST3 theft from Meadow View Sidcup - Appeal for information

Please be aware that on Tuesday 27 September 2022 approximately 00:23 am offenders stole a Ford Fiesta ST3 from Meadow View Sidcup, Registration plate EY66ULB, year 2016.

 



The resident posted the theft on Nextdoor. It is alleged the offenders walked up and opened the car. All the keys were safe indoors.

This is an appeal to residents in the area to check your CCTV footage or If you think you may have seen or heard anything suspicious, or have any information related to this incident then please contact Police on 101, alternatively you can call them above or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 1111.

For further information, Ask the Police.

 

Monday 26 September 2022

Complete our Neighbourhood Watch Crime and Community Survey for a chance to win a £25 Amazon Voucher

 

The survey closes on 26th October 2022
 

We are delighted to invite you to take part in our annual Crime and Community survey. The survey is in its third year running, and we want to hear your views on crime, community, and your experience of Neighbourhood Watch. The survey is open to everyone across England and Wales, regardless of whether you are a Neighbourhood Watch member or not. 

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/NWCCS2022

 

All responses will be anonymised and aggregated, and everyone who completes the 5 – 10 minute survey can choose to opt-in to the prize draw to win one of four £25 Amazon vouchers.

 

The results will enable us as a charity to better understand crime and fear of crime, benchmark whether membership in a Neighbourhood Watch scheme or living in a Neighbourhood Watch area impacts crime levels, neighbourliness, and the willingness of communities to work together. This information is vitally important to ensure we can better target our work to meet your crime and community needs and concerns.

 

Last year our survey received 16,000 responses from across England and Wales, providing us with rich and useful data. This year we will be able to compare our data to the last two year’s results and share our findings with you.

 

Please complete our survey and share it via email and social with all the various communities you belong to, whether they be a Neighbourhood Watch community or other such as sport, religious or work community.  This will help us receive a good balance of responses from members and non-members, enabling us to compare experiences between these two groups.

The survey closes on 26th October 2022.

OR - Scan above QR code to complete the survey


Wednesday 21 September 2022

AUTUMN SCAM ROUND UP - Latest scams to watch out for in 2022

Falling victim to a scam can be devastating, both financially and emotionally.

Unfortunately, fraudsters are coming up with a growing number of ways to try to part us from our cash as the cost of living soars, and often appear totally credible.

Here’s our rundown of some of the different types of scams currently doing the rounds, and what you can do about them.

Energy-related scams

The soaring cost of energy bills is prompting fraudsters to expand the types of scams they are using to part victims with their cash. Scammers mentioning the UK’s biggest energy supplier names rose by 10% year-on-year in the first quarter of 2022, according to analysis of fraud figures by consumer group Which? It expects the number of energy-related scams to rise as energy bills continue to increase in 2022.

Fake refund

Scammers pose as a major supplier and announce on email that you are entitled to a refund on your energy bills because of a “miscalculation.” The latest version saw fraudsters posing as E:on claiming people were entitled to an £85 refund, with a link to enter bank details to get your money. Many who received it weren’t with E:on so this raised red flags, but some were.

What you can do:Check the email display name as scammers as latest fake examples include eonhelp.com or Eon Winter Payment. You can always call your energy supplier using the number on its website. Also, check what your most recent bill says, and remember that in current times it’s unfortunately unlikely that you will be due a refund. Your supplier would never contact you to request your bank details, as it already has these for your direct debit payments.

Debt collector scam

Fraudsters are taking advantage of customers whose energy suppliers have gone bust over recent years, with debt collector demands claiming they have an outstanding balance on their account. Emails may even be addressed by name, as customer information passes through many channels when a firm goes under, such as energy brokers, new suppliers, and debt collection agencies. Find out more about what happens if your energy supplier goes bust in our article What happens if my energy supplier stops trading?


What you can do: Contact aimed at collecting an outstanding balance or returning credit on your account should only be received several months after your supplier goes out of business. You should never receive a request years later, as has been the case for scammers who targeted Brilliant Energy customers. If you receive a request for a debt you were unaware of from a previous energy supplier you should contact Action Fraud either online or by calling 0300 123 2040.

Meter tampering scam

Energy regulator Ofgem warned in May 2022 of claims on social media that you could save money on energy bills by tampering with your meter. A man in Leicester was given a three-year prison sentence in 2018 for tampering with his meter, as this risked causing an explosion and endangering lives.

What you can do: If you are worried that a meter has been tampered with, you can make an anonymous call to Stay Energy Safe on 0800 023 2777. Turn off the gas if you smell gas, and open windows and doors, and leave the property. Call National Grid Gas on 0800 111999.

Government rebate scam

Another scam involves fake messages or emails claiming to be from energy regulator Ofgem asking people to apply for the government’s £400 energy rebate. Actually, this will automatically be applied to bills from October, so people don’t need to do anything.

What you can do: Be extremely wary of unsolicited emails, texts and WhatsApp messages claiming to be from energy regulator Ofgem or your supplier. If you receive an email, click on the sender’s name to show the address, and then check this against your supplier’s domain name on its website or previous official emails. Your supplier will never request your bank details, as they have them already for your direct debit, and if you’re in any doubt call your energy supplier about an approach.

Energy saving device scam

Fraudsters recently marketed a device called Voltex, Which? Found, on a website, previously marketed under the name Motex. These were for sale on websites, Amazon, and eBay, but none of these passed the Which? Basic safety test, and were at risk of causing fire or electric shocks. There was also no evidence that they would save money.

What you can do: Beware of any extreme claims made by companies marketing ‘energy saving devices’ and look for a CE/UKCA mark to ensure it meets safety standards before using it. If you paid for a useless/dangerous device using a debit or credit card, you may be able to claim a refund using chargeback or Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act.

Pre-payment doorstep scam

Households using pre-payment meters are offered reduced cost energy, according to Action Fraud, by scammers on their doorstep. For example, this may be £50 off an electricity meter top-up if you hand over £25 in cash. However, the scammers use cloned keys to top up energy credit illegally, which leaves you paying for the same amount of energy twice, as your supplier never receives the payment.

What you can do: If someone knocks on your door offering a reduction in your energy bill, politely decline the offer. It’s likely to be a scam, and call your supplier to report the incident (as well as reporting it to Action Fraud – see below).

Price comparison phone scam

Many of us are worrying about our energy bills, and would usually be able to fix our tariff to provide security and reduce costs. However, there are currently no open market fixes on the market that are worth switching to, unless you’re willing to pay a fortune for price certainty. Even so, scammers are calling people saying they are from a well-known price comparison site that’s offering a special offer for a limited number of customers. They’ll stress that you must switch now to secure the deal.

What you can do: Unless you’ve requested a call back, a price comparison site shouldn’t cold call you. Never hand over any of your personal details if you receive a call like this, and refuse to engage in conversation.

Green home improvement grants scam

Scammers have been known to impersonate government schemes that offer energy-efficient grants and initiatives, such as the Green Homes Grant from 2020 to 2021. Be very wary of tradesmen claiming to install such measures, and wanting your personal details.

What you can do: Don’t sign up to anything off the back of a cold call or approach from a tradesman. Look into legitimate schemes, do your research, and get several quotes. You can use Which? Trusted Traders, for example, to find trustworthy tradesmen nearby. Residents are reminded of Bexley's What Tradesman Scheme https://whattradesman.org.uk/ where, all the traders are local and have been vetted by Trading Standards.

Investment/ financial scams

Always be very wary if you’re contacted about a financial opportunity or investment that looks too good to be true – here are some to look out for.

Scam HMRC text message promising cash

One scam text message currently circulating claims to be from HMRC and says the taxman is issuing you with a tax refund. It then asks you to tap a link so that you can claim the payment. To do this, you must enter your banking details, which are then used to steal money from you.

What you can do: Never click on any link, even if it looks authentic, or give out your bank details if requested by an email or text message. Instead, contact the organisation involved directly and see whether they have contacted you. You can report suspected phishing or spam texts to your mobile network provider by forwarding them to 7726 (these are the numbers on your telephone keypad that spell out the word ‘SPAM’). Make sure you’ve installed the latest software and app updates to protect your devices from the latest threats too. Find out how to do this https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/securing-your-devices

‘Suspicious activity on your account’ scam

You get a call or text message from someone pretending to be from your bank telling you there’s been some suspicious activity on your account, which they will tell you has been frozen. They will ask for your banking details supposedly to confirm your identity and resolve the problem, but, use these to steal from you.

What you can do: Banks will never ask you for your PIN number or your online banking passwords, nor will they ask you to email or text your banking details, so hang up immediately if someone asks you for this information.

If you want to check whether it really is your bank contacting you, end the call and telephone your bank from another phone number, as sometimes scammers will stay on the line, so that when you redial what you think is your bank, they reconnect with you.

Payment attempted’ scam

You receive a text message or call supposedly from your bank telling you that a payment was attempted from your account to a new payee. The message says that if it wasn’t you, you should click on the link shown. This will take you to a fake website where you’ll be asked to confirm your banking details. This information will be used to steal money from your bank account.

What you can do: Never click on any link that is texted to you without first checking directly with your bank whether it’s authentic, and remember, that your bank won’t ever get in touch asking for your bank details or passwords.

Forward any suspicious or unsolicited texts to your network operator on 7726, so you’ll no longer receive texts from that number.

Ghost broking scam

You receive an email inviting you to buy car insurance, or spot an advert for competitive cover posted on social media, from a well-known insurance brand. Scammers will either forge insurance documents to persuade you the cover is genuine, or they will actually take out a real policy for you but then cancel it straight afterwards, pocketing your premium. Victims often don’t realise they are without cover until they need to make a claim or are stopped by the police.

What you can do: If you’re offered an insurance deal that seems too good to be true, then it probably is and you should steer clear. If you are not sure whether the broker is legitimate or not, check on the Financial Conduct Authority or the British Insurance Brokers’ Association website for a list of all authorised insurance brokers. If in doubt, you can also get in touch with the insurance company directly to verify the broker’s details. If you think that you have been a victim of a ghost broker, you can report your concerns to Action Fraud at actionfraud.police.uk or on 0300 123 2040.

Pension review scam on the next page: -

You’re contacted and offered a free pension review. This may be via text, email or you could spot a fake online advert. If you provide your details, you may receive a call or visit from a fraudster claiming to offer financial advice, who will recommend that you move your money into another scheme, or fake investments.

What you can do: If someone contact you offering a pension review, ignore their approach. Keep your pension information to yourself, and don’t share details with anyone you don’t know. If you’re aged 50 or over, you can also speak with Pension Wise on the phone, another government supported resource who offer free and impartial guidance about your pension options. Find out more about scams involving your retirement savings in our article Don’t let scammers steal your retirement.

Early access to your pension

Scammers tell you that you’re free to access your retirement savings before the age of 55, but if you do this, you’ll not only have to pay a hefty tax charge, at least 55% but sometimes as much as 70% of your pension pot, but you’ll also have fees taken from your pension for the transfer, which can be 20% or more of your pension savings.

What you can do: Remember that 55 is the earliest age you can take your pension benefits. If you have a regulated financial adviser, speak with them in the first instance if you need help with your pension or are wondering if you should access your retirement savings. If you don’t have an adviser, the government-supported Pensions Advisory Service provides free independent and impartial information and guidance.

Loan fee fraud

Loan fee fraud is an increasingly common scam which is reported to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), with people losing £220 each on average.

The ‘loan provider’ will tell you that your loan is approved and then ask you to pay an upfront fee before the loan amount can be released. They then take the payment but never provide you with the loan.

What you can do: Always be wary of unsolicited approaches about loans and don’t click on links offering them. It’s also highly unusual to be asked to make a payment to a lender, before you’ve been given a loan. If you’re considering taking out a loan from a company you’ve never heard of, check the FCA Register to see if the company you’re dealing with is authorised and stay well clear if it’s not.

Source: 2022 - REST LESS

Tuesday 20 September 2022

Warning over scam energy rebate bills

Action Fraud is warning the public about a sharp rise in reports relating to fake emails purporting to be from Ofgem, the independent energy regulator for Great Britain. The emails claim that the recipient is due a rebate payment as part of a government scheme and provides links for the recipient to follow in order to apply for the rebate. The links in the emails lead to malicious websites designed to steal personal and financial information.

Between Monday 22nd August 2022 and Monday 5th September 2022, a total of 1,567 phishing emails related to this scam have been reported via the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS). All the emails display the email subject header “Claim your bill rebate now”. Offenders are using the Ofgem brand logo and colours to make the emails look as authentic as possible. However, the emails ask recipients to “apply for an energy bill rebate before September 2020”, which is what prompted many recipients to realise the emails weren’t genuine.

You can view examples of the fake emails in the social media posts on TwitterFacebook and Instagram
Also on the BBC news.

How you can protect yourself and others
If you have any doubts about a message, contact the organisation directly. Don’t use the numbers or address in the message – use the details from their official website. Remember, your bank (or any other official source) will never ask you to supply personal information via email.

If you have received an email which you’re not quite sure about, forward it to report@phishing.gov.uk. Send them emails that feel suspicious, even if you're not certain they're a scam - they can check.
 
For advice on how to stay secure online, please visit: www.cyberaware.gov.uk.

Monday 19 September 2022

Beware Amazon Gift Card phishing scam email

Amazon £500 Gift Card! scam email

This message was sent by a local Bexley resident to alert others. It is a screenshot to show the fake sender address, the phishing scam, which is clearly not from Amazon domain. Note the urgency reminder to say second attempt made but in a grammatical error and not correct english phrase you would expect from Amazon.

Please be aware of such phishing scams or report to report@phishing.gov.uk or report it to Action Fraud.  You may also report to Amazon at stop-spoofing@amazon.co.uk.

*Do not click on links or attachments in unexpected or suspicious texts or emails.

Visit Action Fraud to learn more about phishing email fraud.

Knowing what to look for and how to avoid scams is the best way to stay safe. The Which? guides tell you about different scams to watch out for.

Friday 16 September 2022

Changes to Bexley services - Monday 19 September 2022


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Queen Elizabeth II 1926 - 2022
Friday 16 September 2022
The sad death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II was announced by Buckingham Palace on 8 September 2022.
 
 
Changes to Bexley services - Monday 19 September 2022 

His Majesty King Charles III has announced that Monday 19 September will be a Bank Holiday to mark the day of the State Funeral of Queen Elizabeth II. The state funeral will take place at 11am on Monday 19 September.The following services are not operating on Monday 19 September: 

  • Council Contact Centre
  • Schools 
  • Reuse and recycling centres 
  • Libraries 
  • Sidcup, Crook Log and Erith leisure centres 

Waste and recycling collections 

There will be no waste and recycling collections on Monday 19 September. All collections will be collected one day later from Monday 19 September. For example, if your normal collection day is Tuesday, your bins will be collected Wednesday instead. Normal collection days will resume from Monday 26 September. 

Parking and traffic enforcement arrangements 

Council operated car parks and on-street paid-for parking bays and permit bays are free on Monday 19 September, however, all other terms and conditions still apply.
                
 
 
 
National Moment of Reflection 

The government announced that a minute’s silence will be held on Sunday 18 September to mark a National Moment of Reflection to pay our respects to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. A one-minute silence will take place at 8pm on Sunday 18 September across the UK – the night before the State Funeral. The public are invited to take part in a minute’s silence to mark this Moment of Reflection.
      
 
 
 
The State Funeral and Committal Service

The Royal Household has published details of the State Funeral of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II that will take place at Westminster Abbey on Monday 19 September at 11am. A Committal Service at St George’s Chapel, Windsor, will take place later the same day at 4pm. 

On the morning of the State Funeral, the Lying-in-State will end at 6:30am as the final members of the public are admitted. At 10:44am the Coffin will be borne in Procession on the State Gun Carriage of the Royal Navy from the Palace of Westminster to Westminster Abbey for the State Funeral. 

Almost 200 people who were recognised in The Queen’s Birthday Honours earlier this year will join the congregation, including those who made extraordinary contributions to the response to the COVID-19 outbreak, and have volunteered in their local communities. 

Towards the end of the Service, at approximately 11:55am, Last Post will sound followed by Two Minute’s Silence to be observed in the Abbey, and throughout the United Kingdom. The National Anthem will bring the State Funeral Service to a close around midday. 

The Coffin will be transferred to the State Hearse to travel to Windsor. The Committal Service will begin at 4pm. The National Anthem will be sung at the conclusion of the Service. The Queen is to be buried together with The Duke of Edinburgh.
 
 
 
Book of Condolence in Civic Offices
 
Mourning and Condolence arrangements

Following the death of Her Majesty The Queen, it is His Majesty The King's wish that a period of Royal Mourning be observed until seven days after The Queen’s Funeral.

Memorial flowers 

Everyone in the borough is welcome to bring flowers to Hall Place and Danson House. 

Hall Place - at the Visitors Centre Courtyard from 8am to 6pm. 
Danson House – inside the forecourt at the front of Danson House. 

Council staff will be at both locations from 9:30am to 5pm to assist with the laying of the flowers until Monday 19 September. Any flowers that are brought to Civic Offices will be transported safely to one of these venues by Council Staff. Where possible please remove all wrapping from floral tributes before leaving them. Removing the wrapping will aid the longevity of the flowers and will assist in subsequent composting which will start between one week and a fortnight after the funeral. 

Book of Condolence

A Book of Condolence was made available for any Bexley resident to sign at the Civic Offices in Bexleyheath. Thank you to all those who have left messages.

There are no physical Books of Condolence at the Royal Residences.An online Book of Condolence for those who wish to leave messages is available on the Royal website.                      
 
 
 
Union Flags in Bexley

All Council-managed Union Flags will be lowered to half mast until 8am on Tuesday 19 September. 

The flags are flown at Civic Offices, Danson Park, Lesnes Abbey Woods, East Wickham Open Space, Foots Cray Meadows and Hall Place & Gardens.
      
 
 
The British Monarchy
Public Proclamation of Accession

A Reading of the Proclamation ceremony for King Charles III was held at 2pm on Sunday 11 September at Civic Offices, Bexleyheath. 

Residents wishing to watch the Proclamation can do so below. The ceremony followed the national proclamation of the new monarch, Charles III, on 10 September.
  
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Further information

Please share this important service information with neighbours, friends or relatives who may not have received it.
 
 
 
 
London Borough of Bexley logo

Range Rover theft in Falconwood & Welling - Appeal for information

Please be aware that on Sunday 11 September 2022 between 2 and 3 am offenders stole a red Range Rover Sport, Registration plate T5BEY, year 2021, from a driveway in Birch Grove, Welling.

Please be aware that on Sunday 11 September 2022 between 2 and 3 am offenders stole a red Range Rover Sport, Registration plate T5BEY, year 2021, from a driveway in Birch Grove, Welling.

The resident immediately reported the incident on the Nextdoor app and to the Police and given a crime reference.

This is an appeal to residents to check your CCTV footage or If you think you may have seen or heard anything suspicious, or have any information related to this incident then please contact Falconwood & Welling Police on 101, or 020 8721 2022, or via email at falconwood.welling.snt@met.police.uk alternatively you can call them above or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 1111.

For further information, Ask the Police.

Thursday 15 September 2022

Hyundai IONIQ car theft - Falconwood & Welling - Appeal for information

Please be aware that on Tuesday 13 September 2022 between 2 and 3 am offenders stole a white Hyundai IONIQ (electric), Registration plate EJ18FHN, year 2018, from a driveway in Yorkland Avenue, Welling (Northumberland End).

 

Please be aware that between 2am to 3am on Tuesday 13 September 2022 offenders have stolen a white Hyundai IONIQ (electric) vrm EJ18FHN parked on the driveway in Yorkland Ave.

The resident immediately reported the incident on the Nextdoor app and to the Police and given a crime reference.

This is an appeal to residents to check your CCTV footage or If you think you may have seen or heard anything suspicious, or have any information related to this incident then please contact Falconwood & Welling Police on 101, or 020 8721 2022, or via email at falconwood.welling.snt@met.police.uk alternatively you can call them above or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 1111.

For further information, Ask the Police.

Notorious 'Hi Mum and Dad' scam

This heartless scam comes at a time when hearing that a loved one is in need of some financial support to pay urgent bills may not be too much of a surprise.

Earlier this year, Action Fraud warned that between 3 February and 21 June this year it had received 1,235 reports of criminals posing on WhatsApp as loved ones in need, amounting to a total financial loss of £1.5m.

And now, we have evidence that scammers are branching out from WhatsApp and also using text messages to target victims. Here, we show you what this scam typically looks like, how to avoid it and how to report it.

Faux family texts

Range Rover theft in East Wickham - Appeal for information

Please be aware that on Thursday 15 September 2022 between 2 and 3 am (approximately 2.47am) 2 male offenders stole a grey Range Rover Sport, Registration plate Y28RUF, year 2016, parked on and from the resident's drive in Montrose Avenue, Welling.





Please be aware that between 2am to 3am on Thursday 15 September 2022 offenders have stolen a grey Range Rover Sport vrm Y28RUF parked on the driveway in Montrose Ave.

The resident immediately alerted the brazen incident on her Neighbourhood Watch Whatsapp group, followed by reporting it to the Police and given a crime reference.

This is an appeal to residents to check your CCTV footage or If you think you may have seen or heard anything suspicious, or have any information related to this incident then please contact East Wickham Police on 101, or 020 8721 2025, or via email at eastwickham.snt@met.police.uk alternatively you can call them above or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 1111.

For further information, Ask the Police.

Action Fraud Warning as criminals exploit cost of living crisis to target the public with energy rebate scams

Energy prices are set to increase on 1 October 2022 and in the last two weeks, more than 1,500 reports have been made to the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) about scam emails purporting to be about energy rebates from Ofgem, the independent energy regulator for Great Britain.

In the two weeks from Monday 22nd August to Monday 5th August 2022, a total of 1,567 phishing emails related to this scam were reported via the Suspicious Email Reporting Service (SERS).

Detective Chief Inspector Hayley King, from the City of London Police, said:

“It is shameful that in a time of financial hardship, criminals are targeting members of the public by claiming they are entitled to receiving rebates and refunds.

“If an email is genuine, the company will never push you into handing over your details. Always take a moment to consider if the request you have received is genuine.

“We would always urge people to follow the Take Five to Stop Fraud advice and think carefully before giving out their personal and financial details.”

In this instance, the reported scam emails claim that the recipient is due an energy rebate payment as part of a government scheme and provides links for the recipient to follow to apply for the rebate. The links in the emails lead to malicious websites designed to steal personal and financial information.

All of the reported emails display the email subject header “Claim your bill rebate now” and the criminals behind the scam are using the Ofgem logo and colours to make the email appear authentic.

However the emails ask recipients to “apply for an energy bill rebate before September 2020”, which prompted many recipients to realise the emails were not genuine and subsequently report the scam.

An Ofgem spokesperson said:

“Protecting consumers is our top priority and it is alarming that vulnerable customers are being preyed upon in this way when people are already struggling so much. That’s why, as energy regulator, on top of issuing our own warnings and advice, we have asked all energy suppliers to ensure clear and up to date information on scams is easily accessible on their websites.

“We take these attempts to exploit consumers very seriously and work with the National Cyber Security Centre to prevent these malicious attacks. If people are unsure if something is a scam they should pause, check and don’t let callers push you into anything.

“Genuine organisations won’t mind you calling back; only scammers apply pressure and insist you hand over details immediately. If you have any doubts about a message, consumers should contact the organisation directly and not use the numbers or address in the message – use the details from their official website.”

How to protect yourself

  • If you have any doubts about a message, contact the organisation directly.
  • Don’t use the numbers or address in the message – use the details from their official website. Remember, your bank (or any other official source) will never ask you to supply personal information via email.
  • If you have received an email which you’re not quite sure about, forward it to report@phishing.gov.uk. Send us emails that feel suspicious, even if you're not certain they're a scam - we can check.
  • Follow the Take Five to Stop Fraud advice:
    • STOP: Taking a moment to stop and think before parting with your money or information could keep you safe.
    • CHALLENGE: Could it be fake? It’s ok to reject, refuse or ignore any requests. Only criminals will try to rush or panic you.
    • PROTECT: Contact your bank immediately if you think you’ve fallen for a scam and report it to Action Fraud.
Source: Action Fraud (06-09-2022)

Watch out for this WhatsApp scam

Watch out for this nasty WhatsApp scam that enables hackers to take control of your account and access all of your messages. Find out here h...